October 16, 2016

Moments That Endure: Timeline of highlights from Providence College’s first 100 years

final-harkins

1917

Pope Benedict XV, with Dominican, state government, and diocesan officials, approves the establishment of Providence College.

Ground is broken for the first building, Harkins Hall.

1919

Sept. 18: Opening day, with 71 students and nine Dominican faculty members.

1923

The Providence College Alumni Association is formed.

The Cowl archives 1938-39 academic year

1935

The student newspaper, The Cowl, begins publishing.

Judy_Garland_1938.jpg

1938

Actress Judy Garland visits campus and donates to the Building Fund.

Army Specialized Training Program, July 1943, students in bunks, soldiers interacting, ASTP History, Historical, Archives

1943-44

Some 380 men participate in the Army Specialized Training Program on campus in support of U.S. efforts in World War II.

final-ring

1966

Class rings are given to juniors at the first Ring Weekend.

1967

A formal Junior Year Abroad Program is approved.

Bruce_Springsteen_May_5_1973_B.jpg

1973

Rock music icon Bruce Springsteen plays at Spring Weekend. He returned to play in 1977.

1974

The purchase of the Charles V. Chapin Hospital property from the city expands PC’s landscape to the east.

ax003_51cb_9_cmyk

1978

A February blizzard closes campus but fails to deter 7,000 fans from making their way to the Providence Civic Center to see PC stun the University of North Carolina in men’s basketball, 71-69.

Residents Moving In, 1977-78_018.jpg

1988

Three apartment-style residence halls (Mal Brown, Cunningham, and DiTraglia) open on campus, with male and female undergraduates living in the same building for the first time.

1995

The College launches its website: www.providence.edu

2012

The College appoints its first chief diversity officer, Rafael A. Zapata.

final-huxley

2016

Huxley Avenue, from Eaton Street to Ventura Street, is permanently closed to vehicular traffic for the Campus Transformation Project — a multi-year endeavor that will physically unify the campus and create a new entrance, walkways, and plazas.

More from Providence College Magazine

Champion at Life: Basketball star Lenny Wilkens ’60

Mission Possible: First-generation students are fulfilling their mission — and ours

The young and the energetic: New Dominican chaplains embrace the calling

Mission Possible: Maegan Renaud ’17

Mission Possible: Yemery Villafana ’17

Mission Possible: Pedro Alemán ’17

Fall 2016 issue

For love of the game: Olympic medalist Sara DeCosta-Hayes ’00

The Last Word: Bound together by Providence

Moments of Grace: Dr. Grace ’62 reflects on his Providence College history

Behind the scenes at the Fall 2016 magazine cover shoot

O’Connor ’75 develops tax case that leads to historic Supreme Court ruling

Ex-Friars build life around a game they love

PC News/Briefly

Our Moment campaign update

Dominicans an enduring presence at PC

Black and White Buzz

Class Notes: 2007 to 2016 (Friars of the Last Decade)

O’Connor ’75 develops tax case that leads to historic Supreme Court ruling

News from regional alumni clubs

Class Notes: 2000s

Class Notes: 1990s

Rev. Paul J. Philibert, O.P. ’58; theologian and Renaissance man

Class Notes: 1980s

Class Notes: 1970s

William F. Donnelly ’51; Faithful Friar award recipient served in multiple alumni capacities

Peter J. Bongiorni, C.P.A.; retired accountancy professor taught for 34 years

Class Notes: 1960s

Recent deaths

Peter M. Weiblen: A PC love affair that worked both ways

Hon. James E. Doyle ’60; longest-serving mayor of Pawtucket, R.I.

Natalie R. Seigle; retired English professor specialized in business communications

Carol F. Bedard; SCE special lecturer received two honors from Dominican Order

John B. Barnini ’40; centenarian provided longstanding support for capital projects, student aid

Four alumni celebrate priestly ordinations

A great-uncle’s estate gift is helping to renovate Providence College science complex

Dr. Elaine O. Chaika, professor emerita of English and a linguistics scholar

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